04 - 07 December, 2018
Germany

Conference day 2

8:30 am - 9:00 am Registration and welcome coffee

9:00 am - 9:10 am Opening remarks by chairman

Riccardo Mariani - Chief Functional Safety Technologist, Intel
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Riccardo Mariani

Chief Functional Safety Technologist
Intel

9:10 am - 9:50 am Current implementation of ISO26262:2018 Part 11 to Semiconductor development

Franck Galtié - Director BU Automotive Functional Safety, NXP, Toulouse
Although the new edition of the ISO26262 is not yet released, the part11 already brings added value to the current development of semiconductor component within NXP. This presentation gives an insight in how NXP applies the standard.
• What’s new in Edition 2 that can already be implemented (or not!)
• Integration / anticipation within NXP BCAM7 development process
• Practical example of Part11 guideline on safety analysis
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Franck Galtié

Director BU Automotive Functional Safety
NXP, Toulouse

9:50 am - 10:30 am Functional Safety Automation : What’s Next

Mauro Pipponzi - Functional Safety Automation Manager Intel Corporation
Traditionally Functional Safety Automation has focused on the two areas of the management
of random hardware failure and the management of safety requirements. As Functional
Safety Culture grows, the shortcoming of these two worlds not always being neatly linked be come more and more evident, as well as the lack of automation in other critical areas, within the same organization and across organizations. We will explore the direction functional safety automation has to take to respond of the challenges of an increasing complexity
• Functional Safety Automation
• Design for safety
• Automation roadmap
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Mauro Pipponzi

Functional Safety Automation Manager
Intel Corporation

10:30 am - 11:00 am Coffee break and networking

Describes methods to validate the presence and functionality of SoC safety mechanisms in production SoCs, post-silicon.
• ISO26262 requirements
• Latent fault detection and BIST
• Non-intrusive “online BIST”
• Ensure safety mechanism are present and in working condition regularly (manufacturing defect, aging, …)
• Safe State (no reset)
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Kurt Shuler

Vice President of Marketing
Arteris IP

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Alexis Boutillier

Functional Safety Manager (FSM) and Corporate Application Manager
Arteris IP

The automotive industry has set itself the goal of achieving autonomous driving and is accruing the building blocks to make that happen. The challenge is in architecting the next generation automotive SoCs which must deliver exploding performance while meeting requirements for
real-time latency, end-to-end QoS, FuSa (ISO 26262) and security. These SoCs need to include heterogeneous architectures—GPUs, accelerators, processor cores—with built-in cache coherency. Making the right design decisions and performance-area trade-offs, especially with regard to FuSu, is a major challenge for architects. The presentation walks through a proven methodology using the industry’s only ISO 26262 certified cache coherent SoC interconnect.
• New requirement s coming in design and architecture with autonomous vehicles
• Trade-offs with Functional Safety
• Best Practice methodology
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Karol Niewiadomski

Product Manager, Cyber Security
SGS-TÜV Saar GmbH

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Tom Wong

Director of Marketing, Automotive Segment, IP Group
Cadence Design Systems

12:20 pm - 1:30 pm Network luncheon

1:30 pm - 2:10 pm Implementation challenges for coexistence of safety and security related applications within an Automotive MCU/SoC

Mohamed Soubhi - Staff Engineer- Functional Safety, Renesas Electronics Europe GmbH
Philip Lapczynski - Sr. Staff Engineer – Cybersecurity, Renesas Electronics America
The increasing application of distributed electronic control systems in vehicles continues to revolutionize the automotive industry providing more flexibility and efficiency. However, this comes with several security and safety implications.
• Analyzing key security use-cases such as on-board communication, secure boot, and secure
storage
• Discussing the challenge of addressing combined automotive safety and security use-cases
• Reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of several proposed countermeasures
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Mohamed Soubhi

Staff Engineer- Functional Safety
Renesas Electronics Europe GmbH

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Philip Lapczynski

Sr. Staff Engineer – Cybersecurity
Renesas Electronics America

2:10 pm - 2:50 pm Possibilities and challenges of a flexible microcontroller architecture for safety and security applications

Dr. Martin Oberkönig - Sr. Staff Engineer Cypress Semiconductor, Germany
Microcontrollers for the automotive market need to target a broad range of complex applications at various customers. This requires a flexible hardware architecture offering mechanisms to satisfy both safety and security needs without compromising the other domain.
• Efficiently creating partitions in the resource landscape
• Resolving contradicting safety and security requirements during MCU architecture definition
• Combined usage of safety and security mechanisms
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Dr. Martin Oberkönig

Sr. Staff Engineer
Cypress Semiconductor, Germany

2:50 pm - 3:20 pm Refreshment break and networking

A | Traceability and compliance through semiconductor IP lifecycle management
While there is a lot of focus on the verification of semiconductors for ISO 26262 compliance, little is being done to automate traceability &
compliance through the lifecycle of IP. This roundtable will discuss how to automate the traceability & compliance checking throughout the IP lifecycle.
• Associating Requirements to IP and IP Versions (IPV)
• Associating verification and results to IP and IPV
• Automating checking verification results against requirements

B | How to detect and control failures
• Failure Detection Probability
• How to minimize failure in time (FIT)
• How to improve failure rate and reliability

C| Functional safety audits
• How are Functional safety audits planned and conducted in semiconductor companies?
• How much reliance assessors place on the audit findings?
• How to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the functional safety audits to help the project teams, assessors and OEMs etc.?
• How to manage requests from OEMs, and Tier 1s for certification to multiple standards like TS16949, ASPICE, IEC61508 etc.?
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Michael Munsey

Vice President Business Development and Strategic Accounts
Methodics, Inc. USA

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Mohamed Soubhi

Staff Engineer- Functional Safety
Renesas Electronics Europe GmbH

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Priyanka Viswanathan

Senior Engineering Auditor
Arm Ltd, United Kingdom

The first SOTIF draft released in October is heating up discussions. On the basis of ISO 26262, SOTIF outlines a safety standard for autonomous vehicles to close the gap with ISO 26262. How will controllability be conceptualized in SOTIF?
• How to define ODDs accurately
• What SOTIF is tackling and what is missing
• When SOTIF will be mature enough
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Hakan Sivencrona

Safety Program Manager
Qamcom Research & Technology AB

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Karol Niewiadomski

Product Manager, Cyber Security
SGS-TÜV Saar GmbH

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Riccardo Vincelli

Director of the Functional Safety Competence Center
Renesas Electronics Europe GmbH

4:40 pm - 4:50 pm Closing remarks by chairman

Riccardo Mariani - Chief Functional Safety Technologist, Intel
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Riccardo Mariani

Chief Functional Safety Technologist
Intel

Selected project partners will present how AutoDrive strives to advance methodologies to develop fail-aware,fail-safe, and fail-operational electronic components, systems, and architectures for fully automated driving.
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Dipl.-Ing. Erwin Schoitsch

Senior Research Fellow - Center for Digital Safety & Security
AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH

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Bernhard Winkler

Senior Researcher - Functional Safety
Virtual Vehicle

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Renaud Gillon

Program Manager
ON Semiconductor